➠ The Potlikker Papers Author John T. Edge – Survivingtheholocaust.us

The Potlikker Papers Reading The Potlikker Papers John T Edge Buyantivirus.us A People S History Of Southern Food That Reveals How The Region Came To Be At The Forefront Of American Culinary Culture And How Issues Of Race Have Shaped Southern Cuisine Over The Last Six DecadesTHE POTLIKKER PAPERS Tells The Story Of Food And Politics In The South Over The Last Half Century Beginning With The Pivotal Role Of Cooks In The Civil Rights Movement, Noted Authority John T Edge Narrates The South S Journey From Racist Backwater To A Hotbed Of American Immigration In So Doing, He Traces How The Food Of The Poorest Southerners Has Become The Signature Trend Of Modern American Haute Cuisine This Is A People S History Of The Modern South Told Through The Lens Of Food.Food Was A Battleground In The Civil Rights Movement Access To Food And Ownership Of Culinary Tradition Was A Central Part Of The Long March To Racial Equality THE POTLIKKER PAPERS Begins In 1955 As Black Cooks And Maids Fed And Supported The Montgomery Bus Boycott And It Concludes In 2015 As A Newer South Came To Be, Enriched By The Arrival Of Immigrants From Lebanon To Vietnam To All Points In Between.Along The Way, THE POTLIKKER PAPERS Tracks Many Different Evolutions Of Southern Identity First In The 1970s, From The Back To The Land Movement That Began In The Tennessee Hills To The Rise Of Fast And Convenience Foods Modeled On Southern Staples Edge Narrates The Gentrification That Gained Traction In North Carolina And Louisiana Restaurants Of The 1980s And The Artisanal Renaissance That Reconnected Farmers And Cooks In The 1990s And In The 00s He Profiles Some Of The Most Extraordinary And Fascinating Figures In Southern Food, Including Fannie Lou Hamer, Colonel Sanders, Edna Lewis, Paul Prudhomme, Craig Claiborne, Sean Brock, And Many Others.Like Many Great Provincial Dishes Around The World, Potlikker Is A Salvage Food During The Antebellum Era, Masters Ate The Greens From The Pot And Set Aside The Left Over Potlikker Broth For Their Slaves, Unaware That The Broth, Not The Greens, Was Nutrient Rich After Slavery, Potlikker Sustained The Working Poor, Black And White In The Rapidly Gentrifying South Of Today, Potlikker Has Taken On New Meanings As Chefs Have Reclaimed The Dish.Over The Last Two Generations, Wrenching Changes Have Transformed The South THE POTLIKKER PAPERS Tells The Story Of That Change And Reveals How Southern Food Has Become A Shared Culinary Language For The Nation.Music Copyright C 2012, Lee Bains III

<Ebook> ➠ The Potlikker Papers  Author John T. Edge – Survivingtheholocaust.us
  • Audio CD
  • The Potlikker Papers
  • John T. Edge
  • 04 July 2018
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    10 thoughts on “ ➠ The Potlikker Papers Author John T. Edge – Survivingtheholocaust.us


  1. says:

    Yesterday, the individual who occupies the American presidency referred to the nations of Africa, Central America and Haiti as shitholes A few things related to The Potlikker Papers came to mind as I considered the stupidity of the racist who now is responsible for leading this nation He obviously has no idea of history Slaves from Africa built this country and American cuisine would be unthinkable without their essential contributions to its heritage.I lived in New Orleans during the most Yesterday, the individual who occupies the American presidency referred to the nations of Africa, Central America and Haiti as shitholes A few things related to The Potlikker Papers came to mind as I considered the stupidity of the racist who now is responsible for leading this nation He obviously has no idea of history Slaves from Africa built this country and American cuisine would be unthinkable without their essential contributions to its heritage.I lived in New Orleans during the most integral years of my life If you re from south Louisiana, then you know that gumbo is the culinary Holy Grail It s a dark stew that literally defines the region Everyone clai...


  2. says:

    3.75 stars The Potlikker Papers is largely about the politics of food who eats high on the hog, who eats low on the hog, who owns the hog and how that hog was raised The first 180 pages alone are worth the price of admission, and I hope they spark a renewed interest in Civil Rights figures such as Fannie Lou Hamer who I thought I knew something about, but I learned a whole lothere and Georgia Gil, a previously unsung hero of the movement.Edge does a marvelous job of documenting the 3.75 stars The Potlikker Papers is largely about the politics of food who eats high on the hog, who eats low on the hog, who owns the hog and how that hog was raised The first 180 pages alone are worth the price of admission, and I hope they spark a renewed interest in Civil Rights figures such as Fannie Lou Hamer who I thought I knew something about, but I learned a whole lothere and Georgia Gil, a previously unsung hero of the movement.Edge does a marvelous job of documenting the changes in Southern food culture from the 1950s into the 1980s and 90s The chapter on fast food in particular really gets at how foodways evolved during this period Fast ...


  3. says:

    Maybe it s because in 2017 it feels like understanding the South is key to understanding America, or because I grapple with the meaning of being black and woman and Southern and choosing to mostly identify as the latter , or the fact that like jazz, I think Southern food is America s gift to the world, for all those reasons andI thoroughly enjoyed this history surprisingly fast paced or maybe it just felt that way because it was highly engaging of Southern food as it is known and bette Maybe it s beca...


  4. says:

    The biggest problem with this book is that its not what it claims to be This may seem like a distinction without a difference, but it is not a food history of the modern South It sof a collection of essays on popular food fads and chefs in the South, arranged in chronological order It s not a bad book, and it s bibliography is a terrific section of must reads , but for all its presumption to be some kind of social history of food in the modern south, a pretty niche topic, it s surpr The biggest problem with this book is that its not what it claims to be This may seem like a distinction without a difference, but it is not a food history of the modern South It sof a collection of essays on popular food fads and chefs in the South, arranged in chronological order It s not a bad book, and it s bibliography is a terrific section of must reads , but for all its presumption to be some kind of social history of food...


  5. says:

    More of a social history spiced with food than a book on food illustrated by social history, I enjoyed the commentary of how Southern food had evolved in multiple directions over time Be it New Orleans or Charleston or BBQ or Creole or Low Country, the cooks of the South have adapted or made do as my grandma would say It was interesting that everyone Colonel Sanders to Craig Claiborne to Paula Deen to Bill Neal gets equal time Interesting read with a fair amount of time devoted to history More of a so...


  6. says:

    2.5 stars I feel guilty for settling on a rough, ungenerous rating for this book, because I did like it for many of its qualities Solid, thorough history documented research interspersed with personal interviews a discussion of race, socioeconomics, immigration, etc and overall a complex undertaking of the relationship between history and Southern food Super ...


  7. says:

    It isn t that The Potlikker Papers is a bad book, but it also isn t a Food History of the Modern South It is a social, cultural, and political commentary onto which a few food trends and fads are loosely tied That isn t a bad thing, necessarily In truth, I found it well written with some interesting vignettes However, I think the author could have greatly benefited from a class discussing differences in correlation and causation Just because two trends occupy the same general time frame d It isn t that The Potlikker Papers is a bad book, but it also isn t a Food History of the Modern South It is a social, cultural, and political commentary onto which a few food trends and fads are loosely tied That isn t a bad thing, necessarily In truth, I found it well written with some interesting vignettes However, I think the author could have greatly benefited from a class discussing differences in correlation and causation Just because two trends occupy the same ...


  8. says:

    A must read if you are interested in important chefs, restaurants, and food trends in the culinary history of the South I actually preferred the first section, which covered the 1950s and 1960s It talks about how home cooking fueled the Civil Rights Movement, while segregated restaurants were a major battlefield We learn about what motivated the restaurant owners who refused to integrate until the law was changed, and what actions they took after This first section of the book reads the most A must read if you are interested in important chefs, restaurants, and food trends in the culinary history of the South I actually preferred the first section, which covered the 1950s and 1960s It talks about how home cooking fueled the Civil Rights Movement, while segregated restaurants were a major battlefield We learn about what motivated the restaurant owners who refused to inte...


  9. says:

    A semi academic history of the Southern food culture Many Southern chefs are profiled by there are no examples of recipes of the food of the South Overall, the work provides some interesting views and would be good for anyone interested i...


  10. says:

    I REALLY enjoyed this book a survey of Southern food from slavery to immigration I was completely sucked into the stories, seeing how each successive generation took foods of the past and reinterpreted them, and even bymodern stories where immigrants from nations across the globe are moving to the south, and putting their own spin and flavors ontotraditional southern food.The author does grapple a bit with the debts we owe black slaves, especially those that served as cooks how c I REALLY enjoyed this book a survey of Southern food from slavery to immigration I was completely sucked into the stories, seeing how each successive generation took foods of the past and reinterpreted them, and even bymodern stories where immigrants...

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